Based in Frederick, Maryland, Digital Ink & Parchment is a blog by Alexandria Pallat. Her posts explore the integration of faith in every day life.

Different Versions

Different Versions

Have you ever had an experience with a friend, but they seem to remember it differently than you? That's how I'm feeling as I am reading about the birth of Jesus. Luke doesn't spend a whole lot of time on His birth. In fact, Luke 1:39-56 is all about Mary visiting Elizabeth while Elizabeth was pregnant with John and Mary worshipping God. There are only 20 verses, Luke 2:1-20, that talk about the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem. Needless to say, even after looking at footnotes and related passages, I left these passages feeling a little disappointed. Advent is about waiting expectantly, hopefully, with joy, and I felt...underwhelmed.

So in my desire to more fully know this story, I turned to another gospel: the book of Matthew. There is a significant difference between these two gospels, one that I had forgotten when I took on this endeavor, but one that is interesting to see.

Matthew 1:18 through Matthew 2:23 is the birth of Jesus, His family's escape to Egypt, and establishing their home in Nazareth. Luke doesn't cover any of that. I don't know about you, but one of the things I remember most about the story of Christ's birth is the star, the angel coming to the shepherds, and the wise men. Matthew covers all of that.

But what I find really intriguing is that while Luke writes about Mary's visit to Elizabeth and the reaction to the pregnant Mary by Elizabeth's unborn child (John), Matthew writes about Joseph's struggle with the news of his betrothed's pregnancy. Joseph was concerned about what he would do with this woman who was pregnant though they were not yet together. And in his worry and attempt to solve it on his own--by "putting her away secretly" (Luke 1:19)--an angel appeared to him and told him not to be afraid, that this was by design of the Lord.

Joseph is described as a just man. According to a Word Wealth section in my Bible, this description means the following: "upright, blameless, righteous, conforming to God's law and man's. In the NT, it is used primarily of persons who correspond to the divine standard of right made possible through justification and sanctification." So, Joseph was a man of God, by God's own definition, and even he was afraid.

How many of us have gone through a situation where we have no idea how it started or what will come of it, but we are afraid? Maybe we are afraid of what others will say. Maybe we are afraid of what we will be like when it's over. Maybe we hope that by hiding it away, it will go away. And have you ever wished God would just come down to you and say "Don't worry--this is by design" followed by specifically the good that will come from it? I know I have. Heck, I still do.

But that's the incredible thing about Christ's birth: He is the way God told us not to be afraid. And I was reminded of that when I read this passage. That is what this season is about: waiting for Jesus without fear.

We are going to be afraid. We are going to go through all the possibilities in our minds of how to solve our problem. We are going to wonder. But God is telling us that we should not be afraid, that if we just wait we will see God with us.

The News

The News

Talk About Orderly

Talk About Orderly